REI Conversion Podcast Ep 21: Generating Motivated Seller Leads Through Facebook Ads (Part 2: Effective Ad Copy and Images)

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NOTE: This is episode 2 part of a 4-part mini series.

Derek Schlieps is a Facebook Ads expert working with other house wholesalers, rehabbers, and flippers. He’s helped many investors pull in leads for a fraction of what it would typically cost per lead with mail outs. 

In this second episode of a 4-part mini series, Derek breaks down the parts to a Facebook Ad campaign, effective copy writing, and imagery to use to grab the attention of motivated seller leads.

Derek shares his very specific experience from ad buttons that perform well to type of creative/imagery for grabbing attention of property owners.

To learn more or to have Derek help you with generating motivated seller leads head over to www.reiconversion.com/facebookleads

Show Notes

To learn more or to have Derek help you with generating motivated seller leads head over to www.reiconversion.com/facebookleads

Jessey Kwong:
Hey there. Welcome to the REI Conversion podcast where each episode we discuss strategies and digital tools to help you launch, automate and scale your real estate investing business, learn how to run your investing business remotely. Find out ways to automate your business, to better utilize your time and learn what other successful investors are implementing so you can get to the next step closer to your investing goals. And I’m your host and founder of REI conversion. Jesse Kwong. Hey, how’s it going everyone? This is Jessey of the REI conversion podcast. We’ve got a returning guest with us today. His name is Derek Schlieps. You probably remember him from one of our past episodes where we focused every, the whole episode on Facebook ads. He’s someone who has dedicated his time solely on helping real estate investors generate more motivated seller leads through Facebook ads. It’s pretty awesome what he’s been doing.

Jessey Kwong:
And I’ve been in touch with Derek sleeps for the last little while as I’m a huge fan of Facebook ads as well. Now, if you haven’t heard our previous episode this is part of a four-part mini series. And the first part we talked about compelling offers and that is episode number 16. So if you head back to episode 16 on whatever podcast player you’re on, or www.reiconversion.com/reicon016 for episode 16, again, we talk about the overview of running Facebook ads for motivated seller leads and what a compelling offer is, which is really the first part of your Facebook ads. Derek, welcome back. How’s it going?

Derek Schlieps:
Good, thank you.

Jessey Kwong:
Awesome. Well let’s jump right into the thick of things. we, I don’t need to introduce you again. Most of you that are listening probably have heard his last episode. Today, we’re moving on to the second part, which is about the ad copy and in bracket creative for your Facebook ads. Now, as a quick review, I guess we’ll do a quick review, even though I said we wouldn’t can we go through sort of the main parts the four parts of building a strong Facebook ad campaign? I think the first one Derek was the compelling offer. The second one which we’re going to talk about today is, my mind is running a blank ad copy and then what’s the third and fourth? I mean it’s not really, there are four main parts. It’s just how we’re going to break down everything. in terms of the mini mini mini series for the podcast, what’s the third and fourth part that we’ll talk about?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah, so like you said, we’ve got the, the, the kind of the, the we talked about last time and then, which was, you know, the different offers that you can use and kind of how you can structure the campaign. then we’ve got the ad copy and the ad creative itself, which we want to talk about today. And then the other two is really at the, just the, the landing page or the lead form that you’re going to be using. and then the followup then that’s kind of the processes that you put in place to get in contact with the leads and get to get a response from them on the backend.

Jessey Kwong:
Awesome. Okay. and before I go any further, uh, just there’s a couple of things I want to, do want to mention that this episode is focused, you know, it is focused all on Facebook ads for driving motivated seller leads. I do want to let you know, or we both want to let you know that this is not a podcast on the technical setup of Facebook ads. Rather it is all about the strategic overview and approach. as well. If, if there are any sort of terminology that we are using that you aren’t familiar with, please speak up and, and post your questions inside the REI Conversion Community Facebook group. Uh, no question is ever a stupid question. You probably all have heard of that one. Anyways. And the other thing I do want to mention is we do have a downloadable for this episode, and we’ll talk a little bit later about that. But, let’s again, let’s just jump right into it. Okay. Let’s talk about ad copy. So what is an ad copy? Uh, essentially in the most basic terms.

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah. So ad copy just refers to the actual writing that you use on your ads. So the words that you use is the sentences, you know, the headlines, those kinds of things. That’s all that ad copy means.

Jessey Kwong:
Okay. Now, you know, I have experience with, with Facebook ads, but a lot of those that are listening aren’t, are there different parts of a text or copy for an ad? So you mentioned there’s a headline and what else is there?

Derek Schlieps:
Yes. I mean generally if you want to break it down, you have the, I mean if you’re thinking just in terms of Facebook, you’ve got your, your chunk of text that is the main part of your ad. You have the headline which sits below the image, which is kind of like your main sentence right before they have, you know, they click the button to learn more. and within, so within your main texts, there kind of different areas that you might want to focus on, especially the first three lines of text is what will show up, on Facebook for people to see. And they will have to click to, to read the rest of it. So there’s, you know, if you want to look at it that way, you’ve got your kind of, I don’t always say, you want to call out your audience essentially first, right.

Derek Schlieps:
And then you have your kind of right beneath that you want to present your offer or just have something that captures their attention. And then within the rest of the body of the ad copy is where you’re going to list out kind of your USP, which you know, is called a unique selling propositions, if I remember right. And that’s essentially like the main points of, you know, how you are serving the person, how you are helping them, what essentially what you’re offering them. And at the, you’re going to have your call to action, which is going to point them to, to click on the whatever button you want to use to, you know, to try to capture their information, to send them to the lead form.

Jessey Kwong:
Yeah. and if, if somebody, you guys are wondering a USP, what, what could I write or your unique sales proposition, you know, we, we also use this on our website or slash landing pages or whatever you wanna call it. and you can see, and you honestly, you could probably use what we’re using, but if you head over to https://houseleads.reiconversion.com you’ll see three main points that we point out right beside the, optin form to capture that a motivated seller leads. So you can check out the, for all you guys that are wholesaling and rehabbing and dealing with houses, you can check out houseleads.reiconversion.com. Or for those of you guys that are flipping vacant land, you can check out https://landleads.reionversion.com, as an example of what a unique selling propositions are. And you can add that to your Facebook ad copy. So, okay, you just mentioned there are several parts to an ad when it comes to copy. So I think it’s about three, three different parts. I don’t know what they’re sort of labeled on Facebook, but from what I recall, there was a headline. Of course, there’s that little text that you just said, sort of as a sentence under that headline. And then there’s that, there’s a bunch of texts also above that image as well. Is that correct?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah. So sort of a thing that you’ve got the headline below the image, you’ve got the, you’ve got the first three lines of text of your ad copy that is visible to anyone that sees your ad, and then you’ve got the rest of the copy that shows up when they click on it.

Jessey Kwong:
Okay. Now, what is sort of the most important part? Like you’ve got, you know, a few sections there. What do people read the most or look at first in terms of text?

Derek Schlieps:
There’s three lines. Yeah, it’s the first three lines. And then, you know, if that, if that catches their interest, then they’re going to click and they’re going to read the rest of it. it’s, you know, if you’re on Facebook, you know, you’ll, you’ll see an ad or you’ll see it even a post and it’ll say, “see more”. That’s what I’m talking about. So those first three lines are the most important. The headline is actually what they see before. They click on, the call to action button, or when they scroll down a little bit more, that’s what they’ll see at the below, beneath the image that kind of describes it.

Jessey Kwong:
Oh wow. Okay. So I assumed that the headlines, are probably, I thought, you know, most of them would spend time on the headline, but you’re telling me it’s the first three lines. now, what sort of, what sort of things, again, can you you might’ve already addressed this or just said it again, but to just sort of drive it home what kind of things do you want to include in those first three lines?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah, so like I was trying to say before, the first three lines you want to call out, the most important thing is that you call out your audience. So when, if we’re talking motivated sellers, right? Generally what I will say in those first three lines is something like attention homeowners or you know, “Attention: Dallas friends and family”, something like that where you’re trying to call out who you’re actually speaking to to get their attention. beneath that immediately following that is where you want to present your offer essentially or you know, and you can say it in multiple different ways, you know, like, are you looking to sell your house or you know, we buy houses for cash or you know, whatever you want to say, but that’s where you, you communicate your offer very clearly and directly to that audience.

Jessey Kwong:
So before we go any further on this episode, if you’re looking for a real estate investing website that is easy to launch and a system that grows with you from automated features to our pricing, make sure you check out www.reiconversion.com whether you’re a land investor or a house investor, we focus on helping our investors launch scale and continue to bring out new tool features that will work with your business to help you scale like our automated offers plugin and our sales post generator for easy posting on Craigslist or Facebook review by REtipster.com, The Real Estate Investing blogger as by far the easiest WordPress theme he’s worked with for any purpose, not just for real estate, but across the board. Our land and house investing websites are for flippers, wholesalers, rehabbers, ready out of the box with copywritten and images ready. Our investors are launching and using their sites creatively from connecting their own CRM to their own email list services like MailChimp. Drive your leads back to your site, build trust, all while scaling and automating your investing. Easily. Launch a website today https://www.reiconversion.com. Okay. is there any sort of particular thing we should be stressing or emphasizing in, in the copy of the ads itself?

Derek Schlieps:
Um, I mean you want to, like I said, you’ve got your offer, but you want to be pointing people to click on the “Learn More” button. for sure. So like right after you explain, you know that you’re looking to buy homes for cash. you either want to, you know, you’ll list out your USP like we were talking about. So you start to communicate to the person reading your ad and trying to touch on their pain points or trying to touch on ways that you can help them. You’re trying to really, really trying to speak to their situation, right? and once you do that, then you want to immediately point them to click on the button that’s gonna, you know, send them to the lead form where you capture their info.

Jessey Kwong:
Okay. Now there’s a few times you already mentioned a button that says, learn more. Does it have to be learn more or is there a reason why it’s learned more? Uh, do we have other options that we can have? Do we even need a button? What are your thoughts on, on the button itself?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah. Uh, I mean what I’ve found is “Learn More” tends to work best. I’ve also used a get quote. I know that there’s also one called get offer. if you’re running a campaign where all that you’re looking to do is to have the lead to just message you, you can, you know, you can have the message button on there, but that’s your call to action button. And for some reason learn more seems to make the most sense. And most situations, get quote, I would say it’s probably also pretty good. But, it’s just if someone, if someone, if you, if you grab their attention on the ad, I mean, there’s just kind of, it just makes sense logically, like a learn more about what we’re talking about. If you put “Get Quote”, I think it also works. it just might not, you know, I just, it’s not something I know for sure, but it just might not pull in as much attention,

Jessey Kwong:
You know, what, and, out of my experience and A/B testing different different buttons and I’ve done it myself. I know I sort of asked it sort of on the odd audience size side who might not know. But, from my past experience as well, and I, I completely agree with you, learn more has always outperformed a lot of the other buttons that I’ve tested. I don’t know if it’s because it’s less, it feels like less commitment. I don’t know what it is, but uh, yeah, see, yeah, I do see a a higher conversion rate with, with uh, you know, you get more clicks with that. So,

Derek Schlieps:
yeah. And along those lines, like with, you know, not, you know, it’s less, seems less commitment. One thing that, you know, you just brought to mind is that you do for these type of ads, you do want to stress that if your, if your offer is a free quote or a cash offer, right. You want to make sure that you’re stating that that’s no obligation, to them. Right. That’s a pretty powerful statement. But in the ad copy, I’ve found that that’s helpful or even in your lead form as well, but that’s something else. That’s another good point.

Jessey Kwong:
Yeah, no, for sure. I think it’s sort of just psych psychologically, it’s just less commitment. and then it’s, it’s, it’s a lot easier for them to take that step and, and you’re, you’re going to get their foot in the door that way and then, you know, nurture them along the way without having to scare them off right at the beginning. So yeah, so it was a little tidbit for you guys out there. okay. So what are some of the things that you should avoid writing in their ad copy?

Derek Schlieps:
Um, you know, I’ve, the thing, the thing about that is that when, when you’re writing your ad copy, I mean, obviously the goal is to use keywords that are likely to show up. you know, there will be likely to be tied to the accounts and the data, you know, that Facebook has on all its users for the motivated sellers you’re trying to reach. So the, what I’ve run into is that if you use the word rent, for example, not even rent rental, anything having to do with that, that’s a good one to avoid just because they’re, I mean already going to get leads that are, that are buyer leads that you know, that aren’t even seller leads. That’s just, that’s just part of part of the process. You’re gonna run into that a lot. And so trying to avoid words where, you know, like rent a rental, you know, Facebook’s going to pick up on what’s in your ad copy and they’re going to, especially if you leave an open audience, they’re going to try to show your ad copy to people that match the keywords in your ad. So that’s a big one that I would avoid for sure. I’m trying to think if there was any others.

Jessey Kwong:
I mean, one thing and we focus a lot on our website with this in terms of you know, copywriting in general is that you typically want to, phrase things in the benefit of them and, and always talk about them rather than yourself. so versus like, you know, something like, we, we can give you a cash offer today, something may not perform as well as something like get, you know, get a cash offer today. I don’t, am I explaining that correctly where, you want to make sure how you’re talking is more in the benefit for them rather than talking about yourself. And I think that’s sort of a well tested copy writing rule in general. I think that, you know, totally applies for ad copy, whether it’s for your website you know, your headline on your website or your headline for your ad copy. I think that’s sort of a general rule that, that, you know, performs a lot better than, you know, you talking about your own company and what, what you’re doing. Uh, would you agree with that?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah, for sure. I mean, you’re definitely trying to speak to the person in the situation that they’re in. Because I mean, for a lot of these motivated sellers, they are, you know, maybe they’re going through divorce, maybe they’re struggling, you know, to make payments on their home. I mean, sometimes they’re just, you know, maybe they switching jobs and they just need to sell quickly and they’re moving out of state. there’s a lot of different situations. I mean, you can have, landlords that are just tired of dealing with their properties. You can have just the amount of vacant properties and they’re dealing with squatters. So you’re trying to speak to those people in those situations. And that’s why testing out lots of different types of ad copies that are, you know, maybe speaking to just, you know, several different groupings, of those type of people and just seeing which one performs best in a given area.

Derek Schlieps:
But I mean, along those lines, the issue, like you brought up, you know, what do we want to avoid? Facebook does not like it when you directly call out your audience in a negative way. So you don’t want to say something like, are you going through a divorce? You know, are you, are you making, are you having trouble making payments on your home? Facebook doesn’t want you to do that. so you have to phrase it in a way that explains how you help people that may be in that situation, but you don’t want to call those people out directly.

Jessey Kwong:
Okay. and in general, what should be the goal of the copy? Is it at the end of the day, like you’ve got all that copy, what’s, what’s the main goal for them after all that?

Derek Schlieps:
I mean, the main goal is for them to click that call to action button. That that’s your, that’s your main goal. So you, I mean, like, like, you know, it starts as a process, right? It starts with calling out your audience, getting their attention. and part of that is the image using the image too as a scroll stopper to stop them from scrolling down their feed. But you know, and that leads into presenting your offer to get them interested. You have some details that you provide. And then the main thing is that you’re calling them to click on that learn more button and to try to, you know, it’s a funnel you’re funneling through them, through the process until they submit their information and become a lead.

Jessey Kwong:
Okay. Now I know a lot of you guys listening right now are probably wondering like, okay, I get it. I get, I should do this and I shouldn’t do that. What should I be running? Don’t worry. Derek has been generous enough to put together a, a template or a, an example that you can have a look at. and you know, you can try that. You could test different things. You could, you know, try variations of it. Anyways, that’s part of the downloadable and we’ll talk about that again in a little bit. Now you just mentioned about images. Uh, I know that isn’t part of the copy, but we’re gonna sort of put it under the umbrella of copy slash creative. It is part of the creative. and I like the, I, I never heard of that term. What a scroll stopper. but again, it’s probably one of the more important, I don’t want to say more important, but it’s probably one of the key parts to an ad is that imagery. Cause I think the, I sort of you, I mean you called it a scroll stopper, so it is quite important. what images in the past have you seen work and what, you know, what hasn’t worked?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah. So like you said, a scroll stopper is essentially what we’re trying to do is stop them from scrolling through their feed. And I mean, usually most of the time the way that that’s going to work is that it’s either going to be through your, your first three, three lines where you’re calling out the audience and then through the image. Right? And so the image, a lot of people may assume that you know, they want to put an image of kind of the median value home on their ad. But really the best thing to do is to use the most distressed kind of, junky photos of homes that you can find that are local to the area. So, for example, if you go onto something like Zillow and you start searching for, if you kinda S if you go into their settings and you, and you set it to only look for foreclosures or if you set it to look for homes that are, you know, selling for really, really cheap and you just kind of scroll through there and you look at some of the images of the images of the homes, you’re going to find pictures of homes that are boarded up.

Derek Schlieps:
You know, they have windows boarded up or the lawn is really overgrown or, I mean, I’ve even seen images where half of the roof is hanging off like, you know, their mind, something like that. That’s what I’m talking about. Cause you know, if someone just sees an image of kind of just an average house, they’re not gonna think much of it. And the other thing is if someone really does have a junky home that they’re trying to get rid of, or you know, that there’s looking to see, well maybe I can just sell this for cash. if they see a nicer home on the ad image, they think, Oh well maybe they’re not buying homes that are, that are this bad. So I mean, I look for the worst houses that I can find and I mean, I’ve even gone into like, uh, I’ll go into like Google maps and I’ll kind of do like a virtual driving for dollars on Google maps and just kinda look around neighborhoods and you know, I found some pretty good images just doing that. But you know, it’s that, that’s probably the most effective way to use the images on there. and you can even, you know, you can put four houses and you know, four different images like split it. So you have a kind of like a collage. You can just do one. the most important thing though is just a test and, you know, let’s see what works best.

Jessey Kwong:
I’m laughing cause I, I did the exact same thing too. I used to do ads for, you know, motivated seller leads as well. And, and I remember looking for the, the ugliest, like it looked like it, like it looked literally like squatters were there. but anyways, I remember I had one image that worked really well. There was like a bed that was, you know, on the side of the wall spray paint everywhere, like garbage all over the floor. Uh, another one that found that performed well was a home that looked like a hoarder owned it. And it was just so shocking. there was so much junk in there. It was, I mean, when I tested those images, they, yeah, they, they totally outperformed a lot of the more normal looking homes, even somewhat better than homes that were boarded up and whatnot. So, now do you ever, I always see it on Facebook ads and I’ve done it myself. Do you ever sort of add arrows, like red arrows, yellow arrows or circles in the ads to highlight certain sections of the photo that’ll cause them to, you know, stop scrolling and have a look at your,

Derek Schlieps:
I mean, I’ve actually, I’ve tried that, with a diff in a different industry, so not, not related to motivated sellers. I was actually running an ad for, for a auto insurance and I found that that worked well. I mean, I use a local photo of a, of a freeway for that city, you know, with, with traffic on it. And I just circled a random car and put a big red arrow pointing to the car. And really it didn’t have any meaning. It was just, it’s just to get someone’s attention. So that, I mean, I’ve seen it, I’ve seen it work. But what I’ve found for this, for, you know, for this niche is that if you’re, like I for example, I’ve tested out, like I’ll have like a yellow banner with words across. Like we, we buy houses for cash and I’ll kind of put that underneath or, or somewhere in the ad copy or in the, in the image with the house.

Derek Schlieps:
They’re usually just leaving it as it is and just having a picture of the house works better than, you know, adding something to it. so I don’t do any, you know, I don’t really do that too often. and I don’t really do the arrows or the circle, you know, circling things. but what I do do, what I like to do is I like to, before I use any images of any of the homes that I’ve found is I’ll go in and I’ll, I’ll touch up the images. So this is pretty, pretty important is that you go in and especially if there’s a blue sky, even if the house looks like junk, if you can find one with the, you know, as a blue sky or you know, there’s just something that you can saturate the colors or brighten it up or you know, play with the contrast and just try to get the image to pop more because that’s just going to be more effective at standing out, you know, among all the other things that someone’s going to see on Facebook.

Jessey Kwong:
Yup. Uh, I think a high contrast photos always outperform. Uh, and we talked about this in one of our other episodes about posting vacant land, a property for sale. you know, blue sky, high contrasting images always perform very well. So yeah, that’s a, that’s a great other tidbit there is. make sure you do have those images with, with a nice, nice contrast. okay. I want to quickly touch on videos. We’re having a little too much fun with images here. and there’s a lot of stuff you can do with images, but what about videos? you know, have you run video ads? Would you do that? is it more effective?

Derek Schlieps:
Um, you know, it depends on how you use them. What I’ve found is that if you’re going to use a video, you’re either going to want to run your video, and we kind of talked about this in our, in our previous episode is, is a way as one of the three ways that you can kind of present your offer, but you, if you’re gonna use a video right off the bat, it’s better to run a video views campaign. So essentially you are, you’re, the whole point of that campaign is just to get people to watch it and then you retarget the people who watched the majority of that video with, you know, your, your other cash offer ads. So that’s one way to use it. The other way is to retarget people that have maybe expressed image in your cash offer ad, but don’t quite yet trust you yet.

Derek Schlieps:
You might have a series of videos talking about your services that you kind of drip out to them, over a period of weeks. You know, just kind of building trust. Those are kind of the ways you can use them. But in terms of the actual video itself, there, there are a couple things you can do. You can, you can, I’ve seen like an animated, almost like a, just a cartoon, like an animation, you know, and you can have someone uh, create this for you on, on, on Fiverr or something like that where you know, you just are describing your services and it’s just kind of a video showing, you know, how you help people in those types of situations. Or you can just video, you know, as if you’re the investor. You can just video yourself. I’m talking about those kinds of things.

Derek Schlieps:
You again though, you just have to be careful that you’re not directly calling out people like, you know, are, you know, maybe you’re going through divorce or are you, you know, having struggling paying, you know, home, you’re making payments on your home. Cause Facebook might flag your ad if you do that. so that’s a, I mean that’s kind of what I’ve used and what I’ve seen work well on Facebook in terms of video. And the best thing to do if you’re going to video yourself is just to have, you know, just as you can either walk around with your camera and maybe test out, you know, different, scripts or test out different settings. So maybe you’re talking inside a house, maybe you’re talking in your backyard and walking around or you know, on the street walking on a street, you just wanna you just want to test out different ones and see which your audience is going to respond best to.

Jessey Kwong:
Right. Okay. And my last question is, uh, it’s really around testing. and I guess we call it split testing or AB testing. is this something that we should be doing all the time? and what, you know, to keep things simple for those that, who want to try to run their own campaign. what would you say is probably the best thing to typically test?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah, so I mean, if you’re split testing is, is extremely important. what I generally do is I’ll use, I’ll use a couple of different features within Facebook to test out multiple images and, multiple ad copies at the same time. And then I’ll kind of really drill down on the ones that seem to be performing best. but if you just start with, with, you know, your basic ad and then you just split test, you know, two different things or I mean just one different thing and you have, you know, two different ads. I would say definitely start with the image. The image generally has the most most effectful by it. You know, your first three lines of text in your ad copy. Those are the two places I would start. But usually if I’m going to do any split testing, I’m always testing one image against another. and then, you know, looking at maybe the copy or the, you know, the headline or you know, other things.

Jessey Kwong:
Right – Awesome. this, this show, this episode here was jam packed with a lot of, a lot of stuff here, a lot of strategic tidbits that we’ve both learned along the way. Derek, can we talk a little bit about the downloadable, for our listeners? And for those of you that want to grab this download that Derek’s just going to quickly mention here, it’s uh, you can head over to https://resource.reiconversion.com. Drop your name and email and we’ll send you a link to get access to these shows, downloadable and also all our other downloadables, or resource guides or cheat sheets, from our past episodes, which, um, again are very helpful. Derek, what would have, what have we put together here for them?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah, so I mean I’ve just got the a, a snapshot of the ad and so you can kind of, you can kind of see what, what I mean in terms of the, the kind of images that I like to use. and then it’s, it’s a, it’s essentially a template. It’s, I mean, it’s an ad copy you can use, but it’s, it’s more a template and kind of a mixture of different headline, I wouldn’t say headlines, but different ways to call out the audience and whatnot that I’ve found to work well. and so what I’ve done is I’ve put that together as a snapshot of that and then you can see the, the full ad copy, as well as just a list of USP that I’ve, you know, used on different, different copies that I’ve run. and so you can kind of mix and match and just see what works well for your area that you’re targeting. so yeah, I’ve put that together. Hopefully that’s beneficial to some of you.

Jessey Kwong:
Yeah, no, that’s awesome. for those of you guys listening you can see that there’s a lot of moving parts to running a Facebook ad campaign and it is quite time intensive. and that’s sort of where Derek comes into play. if you’re interested in working with Derek, you can reach out to him at https://reiconversion.com/facebookleads. Derek, can you sort of share a little bit about what you’re offering our listeners here?

Derek Schlieps:
Yeah. So for any of you guys who go ahead and click on the, or, you know, go to the link that Jesse mentioned to get in contact with us. I’m offering for the first month a 50% off of my usual retainer fee. So, you know, if you guys are interested, that’s definitely something you want to take advantage of sooner rather than later.

Jessey Kwong:
Awesome. Yeah. So make sure you check that out. Derek, again, he works with all his investors and last of the first episode we were just talking specifically of you know, how much a lead can sometimes cost and it’s like, wow, really? you know, I, we don’t want to set any expectations but and, and what I mean by wow, like some of the leads were pretty darn cheap and, and some of them actually closed. So Derek they, you can, they can reach you again at www.reiconversion.com/facebookleads and you can sort of go from there and have a chat with Derek. And see what you guys can make work together. Other than that, Derek, did I miss anything else?

Jessey Kwong:
I always ask this question at the end of the episode. So I think we covered most of ad copy, you know, and, and ad creative as well, again, is not sort of a technical how to set up an ad. I’m more of the experience and knowledge that you can only get after having done this for some time. And again, Derek has been generous enough to share some of his findings with us, that you can, you guys can sort of either take on yourself or, or chat with Derek and see how he can help you bring this into your business model and start you know, automating some of the lead generation for finding motivated seller leads. So, okay, well, Derek, thanks again for coming on this episode. the next one, I already forgot what, what did we say? We’re going to talk about, Oh, right landing landing pages slash websites or, or you know, lead forms.

Jessey Kwong:
And that’s what we’re going to sort of spend most of the time on next episode. So if you guys have any more questions and sometimes it’s I always say this on the episodes. Uh, I don’t get to hear enough from you guys though. I do see the listenership growing, each episode. Uh, it’d be great to hear from some of you guys if you have any questions, just come into our Facebook group, REI conversion community Facebook group. You’ll find myself and Derek in there as well as all our other podcast guests inside of there. If you ever have any questions, go ahead and, and, ask that. Derek, thanks again very much for your time and I’m looking forward to our next episode together.

Derek Schlieps: (34:04)
Yeah, man, thanks so much for having me.

Jessey Kwong:
My pleasure. Awesome. Thanks again. Cheers. Before you stop this podcast or head to the next episode, I want to personally thank you for listening to this episode of the RTI conversion podcast. If you found this helpful, we’d greatly appreciate an awesome review and rating on whichever platform you’re listening to this on, and if you have two minutes and wanted to step it up even more and help others, feel free to share this in other Facebook groups or pages or any communities, giving others a heads up of the REI conversion podcasts or this specific episode that may help them on their investing journey. Once again, thanks very much for listening and catch you on the next episode.

Jessey

Jessey

My desire in starting REI Conversion was to empower other real estate investors with the digital tools to help get investors started and grow their business. Not only do I work closely with the team and services at REI Conversion but enjoy building relationships with all of our investors (don’t be afraid to book a tour/call with me).